Date of Award

Spring 1994

Document Type

Thesis

Department

Life & Environmental Sciences

First Advisor

Jean Smith

Second Advisor

Marilyn Schendel

Third Advisor

David Pac

Abstract

Fifty male mule deer were captured and radio collared in the northwest slope of the Bridger Mountains, Montana, during the years 1990-93. The animals were monitored from ground and air using radio telemetry. From the data collected, it was found that the deer occupy one population- habitat unit in which there were distinct winter and summer geographic activity centers. Among other things, climate and topography influenced the deer's movements. High mortality was evident in the male segment of the population. Hunting was the predominant cause of mortality among adult males. Natural causes of mortality had a significant impact on fawn survival. Knowledge of deer activity, along with a good management plan, is needed in order for a stable population of mule deer to exist in the Bridger Mountain ecosystem.

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