Dax: Archaeological Scent Detection Canine

carrollscholars.contributor.emailhdecker@carroll.edu
carrollscholars.contributor.institutionCarroll College
carrollscholars.event.enddate4/25/2019 13:15
carrollscholars.event.startdate4/25/2019 13:00
carrollscholars.legacy.contextkey14307896
carrollscholars.legacy.itemurlhttps://scholars.carroll.edu/surf/2019/all/16
carrollscholars.location.campusbuildingCampus Center - Avila/Desmet
carrollscholars.object.disciplinesAnimal Sciences; Archaeological Anthropology
carrollscholars.object.fieldofstudyAnthrozoology and Archaeology
carrollscholars.object.majorAnthrozoology
dc.contributor.authorDecker, Hannah
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-30T10:46:49Z
dc.date.available2020-04-30T10:46:49Z
dc.date.issued2019-04-25
dc.description.abstractHumans have used the olfactory abilities of canines for years. Any canine has the ability to smell out cancer, explosives, and human remains. No one has ever used the olfactory abilities of canines for archeological mammal bone detection, until now. Dax, a border collie, Australian shepherd mix is currently being trained as an archeological detection dog. Dax has been training on archeological bones since she was 12-weeks old. She trains 5-6 times a week on archeological detection. Methods, procedures and results will be presented. The end goal is for Dax to accompany her owner, who happens to be an archeologist, on digs to aid in the detection of archeological bones.
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholars.carroll.edu/handle/20.500.12647/7291
dc.titleDax: Archaeological Scent Detection Canine
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