Delayed Cord Clamping in Newborns and Anemia

No Thumbnail Available
Authors
Robb, Alexus
Advisor
Lewis, Melissa
Editor
Date of Issue
2023-04-28
Subject Keywords
Publisher
Citation
Series/Report No.
item.page.identifier
Title
Delayed Cord Clamping in Newborns and Anemia
Other Titles
Type
Presentation
Description
Abstract
Anemia in infancy can lead to an array of issues with growth and development. According to Tiruneh et al. (2020), the prevalence of anemia in the newborn population is 25% worldwide. Anemia is caused by a lack of oxygen carrying red blood cells, which starves the body of oxygen. Prolonged anemia during development has been linked to various alterations in physical maturation and neurodevelopment. Researchers have hypothesized that umbilical cord clamping methods during delivery can play a critical role in developing anemia in infants. Furthermore, researchers offer ideas about the benefits of increased hemoglobin, hematocrit, and iron related to the use of delayed cord clamping (DCC) can last up to 6 months for term infants, as well as additional benefits for preterm infants. DCC involves clamping the umbilical cord after at least 60 seconds but up to 10 minutes of life. In comparison, early cord clamping (ECC) is characterized by the provider clamping the umbilical cord immediately upon delivery. Based on this information, the purpose of this Evidence Based Practice review is to determine the efficacy of DCC versus ECC in reducing anemia in infants. This simple and cost-effective measure is thought to significantly reduce the risk of anemia in infancy, and its following complications. Although the benefits of DCC versus ECC have been substantiated, the practice has not been fully adopted. Nurses will be able to help educate and spread awareness of this simple practice with expectant parents and practitioners alike.
Sponsors
Degree Awarded
Semester
Spring
Department
Nursing