Sudden Death Revisited: Regression Of Stereotypies Into A Behavioral Trap

carrollscholars.legacy.contextkey12716982
carrollscholars.legacy.itemurlhttps://scholars.carroll.edu/lifesci_theses/496
carrollscholars.object.degreeBachelor's
carrollscholars.object.departmentLife & Environmental Sciences
carrollscholars.object.disciplinesPharmacology
carrollscholars.object.seasonSpring
dc.contributor.advisorJohn Christenson
dc.contributor.advisorTom Hamilton
dc.contributor.advisorJames Manion
dc.contributor.authorAlander, Dirk
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-30T10:03:50Z
dc.date.available2020-04-30T10:03:50Z
dc.date.embargo12/31/1899 0:00
dc.date.issued1979-04-01
dc.description.abstractRats were injected with 20 mg/kg of d-amphetamine sulfate to elicit stereotypic stages which were recorded. These stages were (1) increase in forward locomotion; (2) head and paw rotation; (3) tactile visual avoidance; (k) circling; (5) backing; (6) reflexive stages. Upon reaching the reflexive stage a rat was placed in water, either 21.5° C or C, after which the rat dove underwater and exhibited many of the same stereotypies seen on land. Out of 19 subjects, 2 died during observation on land, 16 drowned in a mean time of f 0.2 seconds when placed in water If? minutes after the amphetamine injection (IP), 1 rat swam the required 9 minutes while under the influence of amphetamine.
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholars.carroll.edu/handle/20.500.12647/3238
dc.titleSudden Death Revisited: Regression Of Stereotypies Into A Behavioral Trap
dc.typethesis
Files
Original bundle
Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Name:
1979_AlanderD_THS_0001158.pdf
Size:
8.37 MB
Format:
Adobe Portable Document Format