End-of-Life Care: Does Knowledge of Care impact Quality of Care

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Authors
Snow, Kathleen
Advisor
Lewis, Melissa
Brosnan, Maria
Editor
Date of Issue
2023-04-28
Subject Keywords
Publisher
Citation
Series/Report No.
item.page.identifier
Title
End-of-Life Care: Does Knowledge of Care impact Quality of Care
Other Titles
Type
Presentation
Description
Abstract
End of Life Care (EOLC) is a common need among elderly and terminally ill patients. Currently, one in 10 patients in the ICU (Intensive Care Unit) are elderly (over age 65-years-old), and 4 in 10 adults have two or more chronic diseases or illnesses. Half of these individuals will die in a hospital or long-term care setting. Both populations are expected to grow at exponential rates over the next 30 years. Coupled with nursing shortages currently leaving ICU ratios of 1:4, the quality of EOLC is in jeopardy of suffering. ICU nurses provide EOLC regularly. However, a lack of knowledge of what quality EOLC is can have negative repercussions on the patient and families. This means that instead of approaching a patient as a list of terminal illnesses, they can approach them as a human experiencing the end of their life. This is a pivotal moment for someone passing on, as well as for their family dealing with this loss. The purpose of this Evidence-Based Practice review is to determine if a knowledge of EOLC has an impact on the quality of EOLC given by ICU nurses. It is thought that quality EOLC can come only with experience. However, continuing education can provide caregivers with necessary skills to assist EOLC patients in the ICU. Nurses and other healthcare providers can use this information to include advanced directives, communicate openly with patients and families, and keep care team members on the same page, limiting obstacles to quality EOLC.
Sponsors
Degree Awarded
Semester
Spring
Department
Nursing