The Use Of The Indirect Fluorescent Antibody Test As A Serological Test For Culturally-Confirmed Gonorrhea

carrollscholars.legacy.contextkey12664907
carrollscholars.legacy.itemurlhttps://scholars.carroll.edu/lifesci_theses/489
carrollscholars.object.degreeBachelor's
carrollscholars.object.departmentLife & Environmental Sciences
carrollscholars.object.disciplinesInfectious Disease; Medical Biochemistry
carrollscholars.object.seasonSpring
dc.contributor.advisorDouglas Abbott
dc.contributor.advisorJames Manion
dc.contributor.advisorJohn Christenson
dc.contributor.authorMinehan, David
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-30T10:03:45Z
dc.date.available2020-04-30T10:03:45Z
dc.date.embargo12/31/1899 0:00
dc.date.issued1979-04-01
dc.description.abstractThe use of the indirect fluorescent antibody test as a serological test for gonorrhea was investigated. The best results were shown using strain F62 of Neisseria gonorrhoeae as antigen at a serum titer of 1:16 in which, out of a total sample of seventeen, 71% correct predictions occurred. In this case the greatest error was seen in predicting false negative results. Strain N9, out of a sample size of eighteen, predicted only 50% of the cases correct at a titer of 1:16. The serum dilution of 1:16 appeared to be the most diagnostic titer to use.
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholars.carroll.edu/handle/20.500.12647/3231
dc.titleThe Use Of The Indirect Fluorescent Antibody Test As A Serological Test For Culturally-Confirmed Gonorrhea
dc.typethesis
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