Bystander Intervention Training: Does It Really Work?

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Authors
Otis, Landry
Advisor
Dolan, Jamie
Roncalli, Elvira
Editor
Date of Issue
2022
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Title
Bystander Intervention Training: Does It Really Work?
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Description
Abstract
American society devalues anything pertaining to the feminine. In particular, our social space promotes a rape culture that objectifies and devalues women, leading to sexual harassment and sexual assaults. Additionally, there is a lack of education regarding sexuality, sexual health, and sexual violence. Sexual assault and sexual violence are prevalent, particularly on college campuses. About 20-25% of female students and 3-6% of male students will experience sexual assault. This research analyzes information that is required/provided on college campuses regarding sexual assault and any bystander training it provides. According to the Campus Climate Survey data, 9% of Carroll students thought the information provided to them was “helpful,” and 44% of respondents reported that it was “slightly helpful.” Similar results were found when asked how well they remember the information given to them, or where to find help should an assault occur. This trend follows other institutions like Carroll. Therefore, researching what other information can be given to students that yields better results can aid Carroll in their information regarding sexual assault. It is essential to build a community that is aware of these sexual violence issues. It must be able to educate its students on what it is, how to prevent it, and to support those who have been victimized. “Our common identities and heritage as women can provide enormous personal and political strength as long as we claim the power to define what women can be and what female institutions can achieve” (Friedman 1995, p. 99).
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Department
Gender Studies