How To Support a Survivor

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Authors
Graham, Sarah
Lundberg, Madison
Cherry, Tarryn
Lynch, Mara
Rausch, Emma
Phillip, Henry
Nouh, Ibrahim
Advisor
Parsley, Kelly
Editor
Date of Issue
2022
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Title
How To Support a Survivor
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Presentation
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Abstract
Sexual assaults happen on every college campus; however despitehigh occurrences, reporting rates assaults are relatively low. “studies have found that only 0% to 5.3% survivors made a formal grievance through university reporting procedures (Fisher et al., 2003; Lindquist et al., 2013). Similarly, 0% to 17.8% of survivors sought help from SACs or women’s centers on campus (Krebs, Lindquist, Warner, Fisher & Martin, 2007; Nasta et al., 2005; Wolitzky-Taylor et al., 2011).” (Holland & Cortina. page 51). Survivors shared four reasons for not reporting: 1. a lack of resources in one’s community; 2. affordability included the costs of care. 3. accessibility barriers occurred when reporting options and/or resources were available, but survivors could not use them (e.g., lack time or transportation) or did not know enough to use them; 4. acceptability or feelings, beliefs, and responses that made it feel as if it was unacceptable to use supports, (e.g., feelings of embarrassment, shame, and self-blame, fearing backlash from their community, worrying about confidentiality). (Holland & Cortina. page 52). Students in Public Health Practice and Theories (PH333) began work to ensure survivors at Carroll felt more supported. They completed an academic literature reveiw on how peer support can help a survivor of sexual assault, harassment, and discrimination. In addition, they conducted 13 interviews of Carroll Students, two focus groups, and environmental scans of the Carroll College Website and of the app called Reach out Editions to scan for usability, accuracy, and Catholic appropriateness.
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Public Health