Plots, Puppies & Deadly Disease

carrollscholars.contributor.emaileyounce@carroll.edu
carrollscholars.contributor.institutionCarroll College
carrollscholars.event.enddate4/20/2018 14:45
carrollscholars.event.startdate4/20/2018 14:00
carrollscholars.legacy.contextkey11995093
carrollscholars.legacy.itemurlhttps://scholars.carroll.edu/surf/2018/all/15
carrollscholars.location.campusbuildingCampus Center
carrollscholars.object.disciplinesApplied Statistics; Epidemiology
carrollscholars.object.fieldofstudyMathematics, Statistics, and Epidemiology
carrollscholars.object.majorMathematics
dc.contributor.authorYounce, Lizzy
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-30T10:46:04Z
dc.date.available2020-04-30T10:46:04Z
dc.date.issued2018-04-20
dc.description.abstractThe Serengeti Health Initiative began in 2003 as a collaboration of the Lincoln Park Zoo and various universities around the world in which a team of veterinarians and researchers have been running a campaign to eliminate rabies from the Serengeti Region of Tanzania. To track the impact of the program, survey data has been collected in sixteen villages over thirteen years of the campaign. In this talk I will explain the dynamics of dog populations within the Serengeti from the unusual perspective of evolving shape versus traditional differential equation-based models. Fluctuations in the survey populations and specific villages surveyed over time created challenges in data organization and in applying traditional time series and population analyses. In this talk I will explain the results obtained via traditional exploratory and regression data analytics, as well alternative statistical methods to discover data patterns and shapes and observe their evolution over time. Finally, I will connect these data discoveries back to their original purpose, the campaign to eliminate rabies in the Serengeti.
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholars.carroll.edu/handle/20.500.12647/7077
dc.titlePlots, Puppies & Deadly Disease
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