Seasonal Changes to Developing Insecticide Resistance in Mosquito Vector Species in Montana.

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Authors
Jones, Amber
Advisor
Hokit, Grant
Editor
Date of Issue
2023-04-28
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Citation
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Title
Seasonal Changes to Developing Insecticide Resistance in Mosquito Vector Species in Montana.
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Type
Presentation
Description
Abstract
Insecticide resistance (IR) in mosquitos is becoming increasingly important to monitor in order to protect the health of humans and other animals. This is necessary for public health because mosquito-borne diseases continue to persist all over the world, despite the efforts to mitigate possible vectors. The development of IR may be why there has been failure with control attempts. The purpose of this research was to determine the effect of several common insecticides including chlorpyrifos, naled, and permethrin on the mechanism of resistance among several species of mosquitoes across Montana. It was hypothesized that mortality rates in mosquitoes exposed to each insecticide would decrease over the eight weeks of experimentation. To test this hypothesis, surveillance sites that were dominated by one species were selected for IR testing. Four bottles were coated with prepared CDC recommended concentrations of each insecticide, while the control bottles were coated in acetone. After the bottles were air-dried for at least 60 minutes, the mosquitoes were introduced using a standard mouth aspirator. The number of mosquitoes were counted upon introduction, and then at specific time increments up to 120 minutes. Each mosquito exposed to insecticides were speciated, and the mortality was calculated. This protocol was repeated over the 8 weeks of the study. The results suggest that there is evidence of developing resistance of the insecticides tested, but further study is needed to determine the pathway of resistance.
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Degree Awarded
Semester
Spring
Department
Biology