Investigating the Effect of Homeopathic NMN on Cognition, Motor Function, and Mood of Drosophila malenogaster

No Thumbnail Available
Authors
Nessan, Erica
Kastner, Kaden
Luly, Wade
Advisor
Otto-Hitt, Stefanie
Editor
Date of Issue
2024
Subject Keywords
Publisher
Citation
Series/Report No.
item.page.identifier
Title
Investigating the Effect of Homeopathic NMN on Cognition, Motor Function, and Mood of Drosophila malenogaster
Other Titles
Type
Presentation
Description
Abstract only.
Abstract
Pure NMN, also known as β-Nicotinamide Mononucleotide, is a fast-dissolving homeopathic supplement that claims to increase longevity and promote healthy aging. Although previous research found that NMN supplementation positively affects physical activity and cognitive function in humans, there are still significant gaps in our understanding of whether these supplements function as claimed. The goal of the current study was to investigate the effect of NMN supplementation on cognition, motor function, and mood in the model organism, Drosophila melanogaster (fruit flies). It was hypothesized that flies treated with the NMN supplement would exhibit increased motor function, enhanced cognition, and improved mood compared to control flies. To test our hypothesis, behavioral assays were performed on D. melanogaster that were treated with 1.2x10-7 g/mL of homeopathic NMN for one week. Following the treatment, a RING assay was performed to test motor function, a mating assay was performed to measure cognition, and a wall following assay was performed to measure changes in mood. The results of this study showed there was no significant difference in either cognition or mood-related behaviors in D. melanogaster that were treated with NMN; however, the NMN-treated flies did exhibit a significant improvement in motor function. Collectively, these results show that NMN supplementation may improve physical activity; however, further research needs to be performed regarding its claimed effects on cognition and mood.
Sponsors
Degree Awarded
Semester
Department
Biology