Study on Patient Outcomes Related to the Use of Ultrasound Guided Peripheral Intravenous Device Access Compared to Insertion Without

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Authors
McGreevey, Mattie
Ripley, Sabrina
Sobolewski, Lorenzo
Advisor
Hogue, Meagan
Editor
Date of Issue
2023-04-28
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Citation
Series/Report No.
item.page.identifier
Title
Study on Patient Outcomes Related to the Use of Ultrasound Guided Peripheral Intravenous Device Access Compared to Insertion Without
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Type
Presentation
Description
Abstract
Peripheral intravenous catheter (PIVC) placement failure rates are staggeringly high and have a first-time success rate of only 65 to 86% (Frank, 2023). Placing a PIVC unsuccessfully can lead to a variety of complications. This includes infiltration of the vein, unnecessary pain for the patient, and reduction of the number of viable veins for future PIVC placement. The results of ineffectively placing an PIVC can also increase the number of central line intravenous devices placed. This is an issue because central line devices have higher rates of complications. Preventing the use of central line intravenous devices except when they are necessary is vital for best practice, and makes correctly placing PIV catheters an essential skill for nurses. A PIVC is a single-lumen catheter placed into a vein typically in an extremity with the assistance of a needle (The Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne., n.d.). They allow for direct access to the bloodstream enabling quick administration of medication, fluids, and blood. PIV catheters are an essential tool in many healthcare settings, and placing them is a foundational nursing skill. Ultrasound-guided PIVC placement utilizes an ultrasound machine to visualize the location of veins for IV access (Frank, 2023). The purpose of this evidence-based practice review is to explore the effect of using ultrasound to reduce PIVC failure rates. By normalizing ultrasound-guided peripheral PIVC placement in healthcare settings, the failure rate of placement may be reduced. Nurses can use this information to provide care guided by evidence to improve patient outcomes and satisfaction.
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Degree Awarded
Semester
Spring
Department
Nursing