Human Resource Accounting

carrollscholars.legacy.contextkey11823334
carrollscholars.legacy.itemurlhttps://scholars.carroll.edu/business_theses/20
carrollscholars.object.degreeBachelor's
carrollscholars.object.departmentBusiness, Accounting & Economics
carrollscholars.object.disciplinesAccounting; Human Resources Management
carrollscholars.object.seasonSpring
dc.contributor.advisorCharles Ericksen
dc.contributor.advisorBelle Marie Talbert
dc.contributor.advisorJames Murphy
dc.contributor.authorForan, Bobbi
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-30T09:38:27Z
dc.date.accessioned2023-10-31T11:47:08Z
dc.date.available2020-04-30T09:38:27Z
dc.date.available2023-10-31T11:47:08Z
dc.date.embargo12/31/1899 0:00
dc.date.issued1995-04-01
dc.description.abstractAccording to Charles P. Edmonds (1989), "People are our most important asset." (p. 42) This appears to be especially true as the global economy changes from an agricultural and industrial based economy to a service oriented one. In a service oriented economy, people are the product. Whether they are accountants, computer programmers, or retail sales clerks, it is the service they provide that allows their companies to prosper. Yet as Edmonds (1989) states: "an analysis of company financial statements reveals no human assets. Although everyone agrees people are important to an organization, no one knows how to place a monetary value on their importance." (p. 42) This thesis focuses on determining the monetary value of human resources and accounting for them on financial statements.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12647/106
dc.titleHuman Resource Accounting
dc.typethesis
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