Working Night Shift and Connection to Breast Cancer

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Authors
Neveau, Natalie
Pickens, Jamie
Sayers, Keetyn
Advisor
Blakeman, Nina
Editor
Date of Issue
2024
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Citation
Series/Report No.
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Title
Working Night Shift and Connection to Breast Cancer
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Type
Presentation
Description
Abstract
Working 12-hour shifts or more during the day is something that is normal to the healthcare population. New evidence has come to light that shows that abnormal disruptions in circadian sleep rhythms along with the exposure to artificial light at night may have carcinogenic qualities that could put shift workers at an increased risk of cancer. Looking at the different types of cancers, the most prevalent diagnosis among night shift healthcare workers appears to be breast cancer. But, because there is a need for health care services 24 hours a day, it's inevitable that a portion of healthcare professionals will work night shifts and therefore be subjected to its potential risks. The purpose of our evidenced-based review is to determine if there is an increased cancer risk for healthcare workers who work night shifts compared to healthcare workers who work day shifts. In determining whether or not there are health risks, facilities who employ night shift workers can implement screenings and protocols that would safeguard the health of their workers. This research will be extremely vital to the healthcare field because it will aid in early detection and prevention of cancer for this group.
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Degree Awarded
Semester
Department
Nursing