Microsatellite Analysis of Culex tarsalis Populations in Montana

carrollscholars.legacy.contextkey14524523
carrollscholars.legacy.itemurlhttps://scholars.carroll.edu/lifesci_theses/609
carrollscholars.object.degreeBachelor's
carrollscholars.object.departmentLife & Environmental Sciences
carrollscholars.object.disciplinesBiodiversity; Biology; Entomology; Genetics
carrollscholars.object.seasonSpring
dc.contributor.advisorJennifer Glowienka
dc.contributor.advisorTheresa McHugh
dc.contributor.advisorWilliam Parsons
dc.contributor.authorStromberg, Kaitlin
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-30T10:06:18Z
dc.date.available2020-04-30T10:06:18Z
dc.date.embargo12/31/1899 0:00
dc.date.issued2019-04-01
dc.description.abstractWest Nile Virus (WNV) has been present in Montana since 2002. The primary vector of WNV in Montana is Culex tarsalis. At Carroll College, the purpose of the WNV project is to survey for the presence of the virus across the state and create a risk model in real time. The goal of this particular study was to find a microsatellite protocol that consistently works in order to create a reliable landscape genetics model for C. tarsalis populations. Three reagent sets were used in order to test which reagent conditions best amplified the three loci, followed by gel electrophoresis to visualize the amplification. The results indicated degradation of the DNA, suggesting new DNA is needed to test which conditions produced the best amplification.
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholars.carroll.edu/handle/20.500.12647/3350
dc.subjectWest Nile Virus, WNV, Culex tarsalis, mosquitos, vector
dc.titleMicrosatellite Analysis of Culex tarsalis Populations in Montana
dc.typethesis
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