The Effects of Kangaroo Care on Parent-Infant Bonding

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Foster, Taylar
Kurtz, Nicole
Iverson, Rei
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2021
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The Effects of Kangaroo Care on Parent-Infant Bonding
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Abstract
The lack of knowledge about skin-to-skin contact can have an affect on the bonding between the parent and infant. Bonding and attachment, for the purpose of this brief, are defined as a lasting psychological connectedness between human beings (Bowlby, 1969). Skin-to-skin or kangaroo care (KC) means that the infant is placed unclothed, belly down on the parent’s chest for adequate skin-to-skin contact (Cleveland Clinic, 2021). “Since the KC method was first introduced, skin-to-skin contact has been reported to improve infant state organization, thermal regulation, respiratory patterns, and oxygen saturation; reduce apnea and bradycardia; increase rate of infant weight gain and maternal milk production; shorten hospital stay; and function as an analgesic during painful medical procedures” (Feldman et al., 2002). The purpose of this evidence based practice brief is to examine the effects of skin-to-skin contact on parent and infant bonding. The outcome of this brief may lead to an understanding that the use of skin-to-skin contact can further the knowledge of parents and nurses to better the bonding experience. Nurses can use this information to educate patients on how beneficial skin-to-skin contact can be.
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