The Effect of Kangaroo Care on Premature Infant Feeding

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Authors
Westlund, Stephanie
Advisor
Lewis, Melissa
Editor
Date of Issue
2024
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Title
The Effect of Kangaroo Care on Premature Infant Feeding
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Type
Presentation
Description
Abstract only.
Abstract
Following premature birth, many infants need to stay in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to receive supportive care due to being underweight and lacking full development that would have been achieved while in utero until full term. Approximately 10% to 15% of babies born in the U.S. every year are admitted to the NICU. The practice of kangaroo care in the NICU can provide many health benefits for neonates. Kangaroo care, also known as skin-to-skin, is the technique of holding a baby, wearing only a diaper, on the bare chest of a parent or care giver. The benefits of kangaroo care include temperature regulation, improved breathing, circulation, sleep and growth, and improve parent baby bonding. The purpose of this Evidence Based research is to assess the effect of kangaroo care on the success of feeding in premature infants in the NICU setting. Nurses can use the outcome of this research to improve feeding in premature infants in the NICU. Improve feeding leads to increased weight gain, shorter time to discharge, shorter transition to entirely enteral feeding, stabilization of vital signs, decreased gastric residual volume, less incidence of vomiting and diarrhea, and overall decreased feeding intolerance.
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Department
Nursing