The Enduring Significance Of John G. Neihardt's Summons To Spiritual Unison In Cycle Of The West

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Authors
Heffron, Matthew
Advisor
Jack Semmens
Robert Swartout
Henry Burgess
Editor
Date of Issue
1980-04-01
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Publisher
Citation
Series/Report No.
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Title
The Enduring Significance Of John G. Neihardt's Summons To Spiritual Unison In Cycle Of The West
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Type
thesis
Description
Abstract
John G. Neihardt (1881-1973) was, unquestionably, a rare individual. He was a mystic, a devoted poet, and an intellectual while competently and contentedly living most of his life amid a prairie society which seldom inspired and never encouraged such impractical pursuits. In addition, he was able to develop a well ordered system of integrated spiritual, social, and literary philosophies during a period of general turbulence. For his notable achievements, he has gained some recognition over the years. Among those who have expressed admiration for his work, either publicly or through personal letters to the poet, are Edward Arlington Robinson, Carl Jung, George Sterling, George Edward Woodberry, Clarence Darrow, Harry Truman, and John Elaf Boodin. Even an ailing Mark Twain once arranged to meet Neihardt. In 1921, the Nebraska legislature officially proclaimed Neihardt as the Poet Laureate of the state of Nebraska (he was the first poet in America to gain such an honor) and, in 1968, instituted a statewide Neihardt Day.
Sponsors
Degree Awarded
Bachelor's
Semester
Spring
Department
Languages & Literature