De Amicitiā: Friendship in The Iliad and Consolation of Philosophy

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Authors
Robertson, John Paul
Advisor
Greiner, Katherine
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Date of Issue
2024
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Title
De Amicitiā: Friendship in The Iliad and Consolation of Philosophy
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Presentation
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Abstract
Through an examination of Homer’s Iliad and Boethius’ Consolation of Philosophy, this presentation works to show that humans are intentionally created to participate and share in friendship with God, which can be emulated and brought to fruition through human friendships. The demises of their characters, the Greek Priam and Roman Boethius, can be charted alongside one another, arriving at a shared destination of discerning the source of happiness. Highlighting the contrast in Lady Philosophy's emphasis on happiness deriving from relationship with the steadfast Divine in The Consolation of Philosophy to Aristotle’s argument of happiness being of a nature that can be disposed of by pathos, perspectives surrounding the downfalls of both characters present a point where the importance and impact of friendship must be addressed. Through the reciprocity found within the friendships between humanity and the Divine and humanity and other humans, an argument is formulated that our relationships with the Divine affect and sculpt our relationships with other humans.
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Honors Scholars Program