Continuous Labor Support and Cesarean Section Incidence

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Authors
Stanchfield, Kayla
Advisor
Lewis, Melissa
Editor
Date of Issue
2023-04-28
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Title
Continuous Labor Support and Cesarean Section Incidence
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Type
Presentation
Description
Abstract
In 2022, the rate of cesarean section delivery in the United States was 32.1% of all births in the country (Osterman, 2022). A cesarean section is an incision made in a mother’s abdomen and uterus to deliver a baby when it is determined to be safer than a vaginal birth (Johns Hopkins, 2023). Cesarean sections are associated with increased risks to maternal fertility, infection, hemorrhage, thromboembolic events, and hysterectomy (Keag, 2018). The Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN) (2021) recommends that there be a staffing ratio in perinatal units of one nurse to one laboring mother. AWHONN recommends this based as many complications may arise that can threaten the livelihood of mother and baby; adequate staffing is required to recognize early signs of complications, as well as to provide emotional support to laboring mothers. Methods to reduce stress including continuous support by a clinician, a positive birth environment, and social support have been shown to reduce labor stress and support endogenous oxytocin release, promoting a physiologic birth (Walter et al., 2021). The purpose of this Evidence-Based Practice review is to determine if there is an association between continuous support by a healthcare professional during the labor process and the risk of cesarean section. It is important to understand how continuous care could influence cesarean section risk to avoid an unnecessary invasive procedure that can have negative outcomes for mother and baby, and how nurses can fit into the role of one-to-one support providers.
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Degree Awarded
Semester
Spring
Department
Nursing