Electronic Mail at Carroll College: Factors Which Contribute to Use and Satisfaction

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Authors
Chaussee, Carolyn
Advisor
Brent Northup
Valerie Gager
Darrell Hagen
Editor
Date of Issue
1994-04-01
Subject Keywords
Publisher
Citation
Series/Report No.
item.page.identifier
Title
Electronic Mail at Carroll College: Factors Which Contribute to Use and Satisfaction
Other Titles
Type
thesis
Description
Abstract
This thesis investigates the ways in which electronic mail (e-mail) has affected communication at Carroll College, a small undergraduate institution in Helena, Montana, and the level of satisfaction with this mode of communication among 21 randomly selected employees. The study has three objectives: to determine whether prior research is applicable to the environment at Carroll College; to determine whether the installation of e-mail on the Carroll campus in 1991 has improved the efficiency of communication, providing a greater opportunity for personal involvement, and increasing satisfaction among employees; and to make recommendations for further improvement in communication both on and off campus. Two major points emerging from the interviews pertain to what factors contribute to e-mail use and how e-mail contributes to user satisfaction at Carroll College. Recommendations are made in six major areas: on-going training; the effect on people who do not have access to e-mail; possible effects of providing e-mail to students; overuse of the system; concerns about personal messages; and system security. Analysis of the responses reveals some important consideration either not identified in or contrary to prior research.This thesis investigates the ways in which electronic mail (e-mail) has affected communication at Carroll College, a small undergraduate institution in Helena, Montana, and the level of satisfaction with this mode of communication among 21 randomly selected employees. The study has three objectives: to determine whether prior research is applicable to the environment at Carroll College; to determine whether the installation of e-mail on the Carroll campus in 1991 has improved the efficiency of communication, providing a greater opportunity for personal involvement, and increasing satisfaction among employees; and to make recommendations for further improvement in communication both on and off campus. Two major points emerging from the interviews pertain to what factors contribute to e-mail use and how e-mail contributes to user satisfaction at Carroll College. Recommendations are made in six major areas: on-going training; the effect on people who do not have access to e-mail; possible effects of providing e-mail to students; overuse of the system; concerns about personal messages; and system security. Analysis of the responses reveals some important consideration either not identified in or contrary to prior research.This thesis investigates the ways in which electronic mail (e-mail) has affected communication at Carroll College, a small undergraduate institution in Helena, Montana, and the level of satisfaction with this mode of communication among 21 randomly selected employees. The study has three objectives: to determine whether prior research is applicable to the environment at Carroll College; to determine whether the installation of e-mail on the Carroll campus in 1991 has improved the efficiency of communication, providing a greater opportunity for personal involvement, and increasing satisfaction among employees; and to make recommendations for further improvement in communication both on and off campus. Two major points emerging from the interviews pertain to what factors contribute to e-mail use and how e-mail contributes to user satisfaction at Carroll College. Recommendations are made in six major areas: on-going training; the effect on people who do not have access to e-mail; possible effects of providing e-mail to students; overuse of the system; concerns about personal messages; and system security. Analysis of the responses reveals some important consideration either not identified in or contrary to prior research.
Sponsors
Degree Awarded
Bachelor's
Semester
Spring
Department
Communication Studies