The Effects of High Maternal BMI on the Risk of Childhood ADHD

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Ryan, Megan
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2019-04-25
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The Effects of High Maternal BMI on the Risk of Childhood ADHD
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Abstract Objective: The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the relationship between high maternal body mass index (BMI) and the risk of childhood Attention Deficit Hypersensitivity Disorder (ADHD) in the offspring. Methods: A total of nine research articles were acquired from PubMed, CINAHL, and Google Scholar regarding the relationship between high maternal BMI and the risk of childhood ADHD. Results: There appears to be an association between high maternal BMI and an increased risk of childhood ADHD in the offspring. Seven articles showed statistically significant results, showing an association. Conclusions: While not all articles showed statistical significance, all showed clinical significance. There is an association between high maternal BMI and an increased risk of childhood ADHD; however, why this association occurs is unknown, so further research is needed to understand the etiology of the association. Keywords: Maternal BMI; obesity; overweight; childhood; offspring; Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).Abstract Objective: The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the relationship between high maternal body mass index (BMI) and the risk of childhood Attention Deficit Hypersensitivity Disorder (ADHD) in the offspring. Methods: A total of nine research articles were acquired from PubMed, CINAHL, and Google Scholar regarding the relationship between high maternal BMI and the risk of childhood ADHD. Results: There appears to be an association between high maternal BMI and an increased risk of childhood ADHD in the offspring. Seven articles showed statistically significant results, showing an association. Conclusions: While not all articles showed statistical significance, all showed clinical significance. There is an association between high maternal BMI and an increased risk of childhood ADHD; however, why this association occurs is unknown, so further research is needed to understand the etiology of the association. Keywords: Maternal BMI; obesity; overweight; childhood; offspring; Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).Abstract Objective: The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the relationship between high maternal body mass index (BMI) and the risk of childhood Attention Deficit Hypersensitivity Disorder (ADHD) in the offspring. Methods: A total of nine research articles were acquired from PubMed, CINAHL, and Google Scholar regarding the relationship between high maternal BMI and the risk of childhood ADHD. Results: There appears to be an association between high maternal BMI and an increased risk of childhood ADHD in the offspring. Seven articles showed statistically significant results, showing an association. Conclusions: While not all articles showed statistical significance, all showed clinical significance. There is an association between high maternal BMI and an increased risk of childhood ADHD; however, why this association occurs is unknown, so further research is needed to understand the etiology of the association. Keywords: Maternal BMI; obesity; overweight; childhood; offspring; Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).Abstract Objective: The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the relationship between high maternal body mass index (BMI) and the risk of childhood Attention Deficit Hypersensitivity Disorder (ADHD) in the offspring. Methods: A total of nine research articles were acquired from PubMed, CINAHL, and Google Scholar regarding the relationship between high maternal BMI and the risk of childhood ADHD. Results: There appears to be an association between high maternal BMI and an increased risk of childhood ADHD in the offspring. Seven articles showed statistically significant results, showing an association. Conclusions: While not all articles showed statistical significance, all showed clinical significance. There is an association between high maternal BMI and an increased risk of childhood ADHD; however, why this association occurs is unknown, so further research is needed to understand the etiology of the association. Keywords: Maternal BMI; obesity; overweight; childhood; offspring; Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).Abstract Objective: The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the relationship between high maternal body mass index (BMI) and the risk of childhood Attention Deficit Hypersensitivity Disorder (ADHD) in the offspring. Methods: A total of nine research articles were acquired from PubMed, CINAHL, and Google Scholar regarding the relationship between high maternal BMI and the risk of childhood ADHD. Results: There appears to be an association between high maternal BMI and an increased risk of childhood ADHD in the offspring. Seven articles showed statistically significant results, showing an association. Conclusions: While not all articles showed statistical significance, all showed clinical significance. There is an association between high maternal BMI and an increased risk of childhood ADHD; however, why this association occurs is unknown, so further research is needed to understand the etiology of the association. Keywords: Maternal BMI; obesity; overweight; childhood; offspring; Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).Abstract Objective: The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the relationship between high maternal body mass index (BMI) and the risk of childhood Attention Deficit Hypersensitivity Disorder (ADHD) in the offspring. Methods: A total of nine research articles were acquired from PubMed, CINAHL, and Google Scholar regarding the relationship between high maternal BMI and the risk of childhood ADHD. Results: There appears to be an association between high maternal BMI and an increased risk of childhood ADHD in the offspring. Seven articles showed statistically significant results, showing an association. Conclusions: While not all articles showed statistical significance, all showed clinical significance. There is an association between high maternal BMI and an increased risk of childhood ADHD; however, why this association occurs is unknown, so further research is needed to understand the etiology of the association. Keywords: Maternal BMI; obesity; overweight; childhood; offspring; Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).Abstract Objective: The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the relationship between high maternal body mass index (BMI) and the risk of childhood Attention Deficit Hypersensitivity Disorder (ADHD) in the offspring. Methods: A total of nine research articles were acquired from PubMed, CINAHL, and Google Scholar regarding the relationship between high maternal BMI and the risk of childhood ADHD. Results: There appears to be an association between high maternal BMI and an increased risk of childhood ADHD in the offspring. Seven articles showed statistically significant results, showing an association. Conclusions: While not all articles showed statistical significance, all showed clinical significance. There is an association between high maternal BMI and an increased risk of childhood ADHD; however, why this association occurs is unknown, so further research is needed to understand the etiology of the association. Keywords: Maternal BMI; obesity; overweight; childhood; offspring; Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).Abstract Objective: The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the relationship between high maternal body mass index (BMI) and the risk of childhood Attention Deficit Hypersensitivity Disorder (ADHD) in the offspring. Methods: A total of nine research articles were acquired from PubMed, CINAHL, and Google Scholar regarding the relationship between high maternal BMI and the risk of childhood ADHD. Results: There appears to be an association between high maternal BMI and an increased risk of childhood ADHD in the offspring. Seven articles showed statistically significant results, showing an association. Conclusions: While not all articles showed statistical significance, all showed clinical significance. There is an association between high maternal BMI and an increased risk of childhood ADHD; however, why this association occurs is unknown, so further research is needed to understand the etiology of the association. Keywords: Maternal BMI; obesity; overweight; childhood; offspring; Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).
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