The Effects of Glycosylation on Prion Protein Conversion

carrollscholars.legacy.contextkey11224628
carrollscholars.legacy.itemurlhttps://scholars.carroll.edu/lifesci_theses/116
carrollscholars.object.degreeBachelor's
carrollscholars.object.departmentLife & Environmental Sciences
carrollscholars.object.disciplinesImmunology and Infectious Disease; Life Sciences; Molecular Biology
carrollscholars.object.seasonSpring
dc.contributor.advisorDaniel Gretch
dc.contributor.advisorJohn Addis
dc.contributor.advisorGrant Hokit
dc.contributor.authorCasebeer, Christopher
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-30T10:00:42Z
dc.date.available2020-04-30T10:00:42Z
dc.date.embargo12/31/1899 0:00
dc.date.issued2010-04-01
dc.description.abstractGlycosylation of the prion protein may be experimentally altered through expression in different insect cell lines. The presence or absence of several terminal sugars may or may not have an effect on the conversion efficiency of the prion protein into its infectious form. The main focus of this research was to characterize the prion protein as it is produced in two varying insect cell lines that are able to glycosylate proteins to different extents. Glycosidase treatment demonstrated that the expressed prion protein was glycosylated. Lectin blotting was used to assess the presence or absence of terminal sugar moieties existing on the prion protein. The differentially glycosylated prion proteins produced will allow insight into the effect of terminal glycosylation on prion protein conversion. This research may provide valuable insight into the still unknown prion interconversion process and disease transmission dynamics, and may have implications for human based prion disease.
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholars.carroll.edu/handle/20.500.12647/2859
dc.subjectprion, disease, glycosylation
dc.titleThe Effects of Glycosylation on Prion Protein Conversion
dc.typethesis
Files
Original bundle
Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Name:
2010_CasebeerC_THS_000526.pdf
Size:
2.45 MB
Format:
Adobe Portable Document Format