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dc.contributor.authorD'Agostino, Josephine
dc.contributor.authorWinter, Madeline
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-30T10:46:24Z
dc.date.available2020-04-30T10:46:24Z
dc.date.issued2019-04-25
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholars.carroll.edu/handle/20.500.12647/7213
dc.description.abstractChildbirth is a beautiful and natural process. While in most circumstances, the outcome is good, it can involve complications for both mother and baby. One of the major complications of childbirth is postpartum hemorrhage. According to Belfort, “postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is an obstetric emergency. It is one of the top five causes of maternal mortality” (2019). Postpartum hemorrhage is defined as “a blood loss of 500 ml or more within 24 hours after birth” (World Health Organization, 2012). In PPH, the uterus fails to contract, causing excessive bleeding. To prevent this, uterotonic agents, such as oxytocin and carbetocin, are given to promote contractility of the uterus to stop the blood flow. The purpose of this Evidence Based Practice Brief is to compare the prevalence of PPH in women who receive uterotonic agents as a preventative measure verses woman who receive nonpharmacologic interventions following vaginal birth or cesarean section. The results of this brief may be used to aid in prevention of PPH. Nurses can use this information to educate and advocate when working with women in antenatal settings. Nurses can educate their patients on the use of uterotonic agents following delivery and their role in prevention of hemorrhage, while advocating for their safety and health. Since PPH is one of the top five causes of maternal mortality, this research is essential in the care of obstetric and postpartum patients. Keywords: postpartum hemorrhage prevention, uterotonic agents, nonpharmacological methodsChildbirth is a beautiful and natural process. While in most circumstances, the outcome is good, it can involve complications for both mother and baby. One of the major complications of childbirth is postpartum hemorrhage. According to Belfort, “postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is an obstetric emergency. It is one of the top five causes of maternal mortality” (2019). Postpartum hemorrhage is defined as “a blood loss of 500 ml or more within 24 hours after birth” (World Health Organization, 2012). In PPH, the uterus fails to contract, causing excessive bleeding. To prevent this, uterotonic agents, such as oxytocin and carbetocin, are given to promote contractility of the uterus to stop the blood flow. The purpose of this Evidence Based Practice Brief is to compare the prevalence of PPH in women who receive uterotonic agents as a preventative measure verses woman who receive nonpharmacologic interventions following vaginal birth or cesarean section. The results of this brief may be used to aid in prevention of PPH. Nurses can use this information to educate and advocate when working with women in antenatal settings. Nurses can educate their patients on the use of uterotonic agents following delivery and their role in prevention of hemorrhage, while advocating for their safety and health. Since PPH is one of the top five causes of maternal mortality, this research is essential in the care of obstetric and postpartum patients. Keywords: postpartum hemorrhage prevention, uterotonic agents, nonpharmacological methodsChildbirth is a beautiful and natural process. While in most circumstances, the outcome is good, it can involve complications for both mother and baby. One of the major complications of childbirth is postpartum hemorrhage. According to Belfort, “postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is an obstetric emergency. It is one of the top five causes of maternal mortality” (2019). Postpartum hemorrhage is defined as “a blood loss of 500 ml or more within 24 hours after birth” (World Health Organization, 2012). In PPH, the uterus fails to contract, causing excessive bleeding. To prevent this, uterotonic agents, such as oxytocin and carbetocin, are given to promote contractility of the uterus to stop the blood flow. The purpose of this Evidence Based Practice Brief is to compare the prevalence of PPH in women who receive uterotonic agents as a preventative measure verses woman who receive nonpharmacologic interventions following vaginal birth or cesarean section. The results of this brief may be used to aid in prevention of PPH. Nurses can use this information to educate and advocate when working with women in antenatal settings. Nurses can educate their patients on the use of uterotonic agents following delivery and their role in prevention of hemorrhage, while advocating for their safety and health. Since PPH is one of the top five causes of maternal mortality, this research is essential in the care of obstetric and postpartum patients. Keywords: postpartum hemorrhage prevention, uterotonic agents, nonpharmacological methodsChildbirth is a beautiful and natural process. While in most circumstances, the outcome is good, it can involve complications for both mother and baby. One of the major complications of childbirth is postpartum hemorrhage. According to Belfort, “postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is an obstetric emergency. It is one of the top five causes of maternal mortality” (2019). Postpartum hemorrhage is defined as “a blood loss of 500 ml or more within 24 hours after birth” (World Health Organization, 2012). In PPH, the uterus fails to contract, causing excessive bleeding. To prevent this, uterotonic agents, such as oxytocin and carbetocin, are given to promote contractility of the uterus to stop the blood flow. The purpose of this Evidence Based Practice Brief is to compare the prevalence of PPH in women who receive uterotonic agents as a preventative measure verses woman who receive nonpharmacologic interventions following vaginal birth or cesarean section. The results of this brief may be used to aid in prevention of PPH. Nurses can use this information to educate and advocate when working with women in antenatal settings. Nurses can educate their patients on the use of uterotonic agents following delivery and their role in prevention of hemorrhage, while advocating for their safety and health. Since PPH is one of the top five causes of maternal mortality, this research is essential in the care of obstetric and postpartum patients. Keywords: postpartum hemorrhage prevention, uterotonic agents, nonpharmacological methodsChildbirth is a beautiful and natural process. While in most circumstances, the outcome is good, it can involve complications for both mother and baby. One of the major complications of childbirth is postpartum hemorrhage. According to Belfort, “postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is an obstetric emergency. It is one of the top five causes of maternal mortality” (2019). Postpartum hemorrhage is defined as “a blood loss of 500 ml or more within 24 hours after birth” (World Health Organization, 2012). In PPH, the uterus fails to contract, causing excessive bleeding. To prevent this, uterotonic agents, such as oxytocin and carbetocin, are given to promote contractility of the uterus to stop the blood flow. The purpose of this Evidence Based Practice Brief is to compare the prevalence of PPH in women who receive uterotonic agents as a preventative measure verses woman who receive nonpharmacologic interventions following vaginal birth or cesarean section. The results of this brief may be used to aid in prevention of PPH. Nurses can use this information to educate and advocate when working with women in antenatal settings. Nurses can educate their patients on the use of uterotonic agents following delivery and their role in prevention of hemorrhage, while advocating for their safety and health. Since PPH is one of the top five causes of maternal mortality, this research is essential in the care of obstetric and postpartum patients. Keywords: postpartum hemorrhage prevention, uterotonic agents, nonpharmacological methodsChildbirth is a beautiful and natural process. While in most circumstances, the outcome is good, it can involve complications for both mother and baby. One of the major complications of childbirth is postpartum hemorrhage. According to Belfort, “postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is an obstetric emergency. It is one of the top five causes of maternal mortality” (2019). Postpartum hemorrhage is defined as “a blood loss of 500 ml or more within 24 hours after birth” (World Health Organization, 2012). In PPH, the uterus fails to contract, causing excessive bleeding. To prevent this, uterotonic agents, such as oxytocin and carbetocin, are given to promote contractility of the uterus to stop the blood flow. The purpose of this Evidence Based Practice Brief is to compare the prevalence of PPH in women who receive uterotonic agents as a preventative measure verses woman who receive nonpharmacologic interventions following vaginal birth or cesarean section. The results of this brief may be used to aid in prevention of PPH. Nurses can use this information to educate and advocate when working with women in antenatal settings. Nurses can educate their patients on the use of uterotonic agents following delivery and their role in prevention of hemorrhage, while advocating for their safety and health. Since PPH is one of the top five causes of maternal mortality, this research is essential in the care of obstetric and postpartum patients. Keywords: postpartum hemorrhage prevention, uterotonic agents, nonpharmacological methodsChildbirth is a beautiful and natural process. While in most circumstances, the outcome is good, it can involve complications for both mother and baby. One of the major complications of childbirth is postpartum hemorrhage. According to Belfort, “postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is an obstetric emergency. It is one of the top five causes of maternal mortality” (2019). Postpartum hemorrhage is defined as “a blood loss of 500 ml or more within 24 hours after birth” (World Health Organization, 2012). In PPH, the uterus fails to contract, causing excessive bleeding. To prevent this, uterotonic agents, such as oxytocin and carbetocin, are given to promote contractility of the uterus to stop the blood flow. The purpose of this Evidence Based Practice Brief is to compare the prevalence of PPH in women who receive uterotonic agents as a preventative measure verses woman who receive nonpharmacologic interventions following vaginal birth or cesarean section. The results of this brief may be used to aid in prevention of PPH. Nurses can use this information to educate and advocate when working with women in antenatal settings. Nurses can educate their patients on the use of uterotonic agents following delivery and their role in prevention of hemorrhage, while advocating for their safety and health. Since PPH is one of the top five causes of maternal mortality, this research is essential in the care of obstetric and postpartum patients. Keywords: postpartum hemorrhage prevention, uterotonic agents, nonpharmacological methods
dc.titlePrevention of Postpartum Hemorrhage
carrollscholars.object.disciplinesMaternal, Child Health and Neonatal Nursing
carrollscholars.legacy.itemurlhttps://scholars.carroll.edu/surf/2019/all/81
carrollscholars.legacy.contextkey14243485
carrollscholars.object.majorNursing
carrollscholars.object.fieldofstudyNursing
carrollscholars.location.campusbuildingCampus Center
carrollscholars.event.startdate4/25/2019 9:00
carrollscholars.event.enddate4/25/2019 10:00
carrollscholars.contributor.emailjdagostino@carroll.edu
carrollscholars.contributor.institutionCarroll College


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