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dc.contributor.authorSouza, Jacob
dc.contributor.authorSturgess, Rhiannon
dc.contributor.authorBrandon, Connor
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-30T10:46:10Z
dc.date.available2020-04-30T10:46:10Z
dc.date.issued2018-04-20
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholars.carroll.edu/handle/20.500.12647/7132
dc.descriptionAbstract Only
dc.description.abstractPrevious research suggests that physical activity has an effect on neuroplasticity, cognitive functioning, and memory recall on both humans and animals (Hotting & Roder, 2013; SchmidtKassow et al., 2014). Furthermore, exercise performed before consolidation has been shown to increase memory involving word recall (Labban & Etnier, 2011; Salas, Minkata, & Keleman, 2011). We investigated the hypothesis of exercise improving memory recall. Participants were randomly allocated to one of two conditions: an exercise group, in which they performed a scavenger hunt on campus, or a stationary group, in which they performed a word-matching task. Our results showed the exercise group (n=20) had an increased number of recalled words in comparison to the control group (N=16; t(34) = 1.719, p=0.095). These results suggest that exercise can improve memory recall function, which has broad applications in daily activities.
dc.titleTrouble remembering? Take a walk!
carrollscholars.object.disciplinesPsychology
carrollscholars.legacy.itemurlhttps://scholars.carroll.edu/surf/2018/all/100
carrollscholars.legacy.contextkey12585942
carrollscholars.object.majorPsychology
carrollscholars.object.fieldofstudyPsychology
carrollscholars.location.campusbuildingCampus Center
carrollscholars.event.startdate4/20/2018 10:00
carrollscholars.event.enddate4/20/2018 10:45
carrollscholars.contributor.institutionCarroll College


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