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dc.contributor.advisorJacqueline Brehe
dc.contributor.advisorJohn Addis
dc.contributor.advisorJeffrey Morris
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Deven
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-30T10:01:05Z
dc.date.available2020-04-30T10:01:05Z
dc.date.issued2006-04-01
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholars.carroll.edu/handle/20.500.12647/2924
dc.description.abstractThe goal of the present study was to both inhibit the a-CaM-Kinase II (cc-CaM-K II) enzyme, and to over-express it in neurons in order to observe if the enzyme has a role to play in memory as measured by behavioral and learning tests. An adeno-associated virus (AAV) containing either sense or anti-sense RNA to the a-CaM-K II protein was designed for the over-expression or suppression of the enzyme, respectively. Morriswater and open field mazes were used to test for the effects of the differences in protein concentration on memory and behavior. An increase in protein in the rats receiving sense RNA, as apparent in Western Blots, correlated with significantly greater time in the target quadrant when compared to the controls, as expected if a-CaM-K II protein was involved in the establishment of memory. Concentrations of a-CaM-K II protein in the hippocampi were determined 29 days after introduction of the virus using Western Blots. The concentrations of a-CaM-K II protein in the rats receiving sense RNA ( n = 6 ) were statistically larger (p
dc.titleAAV Mediated Alpha CaM-Kinase II Suppression and Up Regulation: Behavioral Studies and Western Blot Analysis
dc.typethesis
carrollscholars.object.degreeBachelor's
carrollscholars.object.departmentLife & Environmental Sciences
carrollscholars.object.disciplinesNeuroscience and Neurobiology
carrollscholars.legacy.itemurlhttps://scholars.carroll.edu/lifesci_theses/182
carrollscholars.legacy.contextkey11496387
carrollscholars.object.seasonSpring
dc.date.embargo12/31/1899 0:00


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