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dc.contributor.advisorMarilyn Schendel
dc.contributor.advisorMary Haag
dc.contributor.advisorJoan Stottlemyer
dc.contributor.authorVennes, Jamie
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-30T10:00:36Z
dc.date.available2020-04-30T10:00:36Z
dc.date.issued1999-04-01
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholars.carroll.edu/handle/20.500.12647/2837
dc.description.abstractTen to fifteen percent of all recognized human pregnancies result in fetal loss (Gardner and Sutherland 1996). Of these deaths, many are the result of chromosomal abnormalities. G banding with karyotype, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), marker analysis of DNA polymorphisms, and fetal autopsy were examined as methods of diagnosing genetic abnormalities. They were compared based on their advantages and limitations. The financial implications of fetal loss and the role of genetic counseling were also examined. Additional consideration was given to mosaicism, maternal cell contamination, and the value of knowing the parent of origin of the additional chromosome(s). Particular emphasis was placed on studying the two chromosomal abnormalities trisomy 13 and triploidy.
dc.subjectfetus, genetic abnormalities
dc.titleFetal Loss And The Role Of Genetics: Genetic Testing, Fetal Dysmorphology, And Genetic Counseling In Cases Of Spontaneous Abortion
dc.typethesis
carrollscholars.object.degreeBachelor's
carrollscholars.object.departmentLife & Environmental Sciences
carrollscholars.object.disciplinesGenetics and Genomics; Life Sciences; Medicine and Health Sciences
carrollscholars.legacy.itemurlhttps://scholars.carroll.edu/lifesci_theses/99
carrollscholars.legacy.contextkey11145928
carrollscholars.object.seasonSpring
dc.date.embargo12/31/1899 0:00


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