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dc.contributor.advisorJeanette Fregulia
dc.contributor.advisorGillian Glaes
dc.contributor.advisorErik Pratt
dc.contributor.authorTate, Katharine
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-30T09:56:58Z
dc.date.available2020-04-30T09:56:58Z
dc.date.issued2012-04-01
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholars.carroll.edu/handle/20.500.12647/2497
dc.description.abstractThe relationship between the British Empire and the monarchy of Britain is an understudied aspect of the history of Britain. Examining the monarchy from the reign of Queen Elizabeth I to the reign of Queen Elizabeth II, with emphasis on the reigns of King George III, Queen Victoria, King Edward VII, King George V, King Edward VIII, and King George VI, this thesis argues that the Empire played an integral role in the survival of the British monarchy. Over the course of British history examined, the formal powers of the monarchy steadily declined due to many internal and external factors. As the formal power declined, however, the Empire allowed the informal power of the monarchy to expand, because the monarchy was the unifying symbol of the Empire. The increase in informal power allowed the monarchs to have a more direct formal power over the ruling and policies implemented in the Empire.
dc.titleThe British Monarchy And Empire: The Formal and Informal Power of the Monarchy In Relation To the Empire From Queen Elizabeth I to Queen Elizabeth II
dc.typethesis
carrollscholars.object.degreeBachelor's
carrollscholars.object.departmentHistory
carrollscholars.object.disciplinesEuropean History; History
carrollscholars.legacy.itemurlhttps://scholars.carroll.edu/history_theses/9
carrollscholars.legacy.contextkey11017328
carrollscholars.object.seasonSpring
dc.date.embargo12/31/1899 0:00


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