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dc.contributor.advisorHarry Smith
dc.contributor.advisorBrent Northup
dc.contributor.advisorFr. Eugene Peoples
dc.contributor.authorSantine, Rachel
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-30T09:39:44Z
dc.date.available2020-04-30T09:39:44Z
dc.date.issued1992-04-01
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholars.carroll.edu/handle/20.500.12647/229
dc.description.abstractSelf-disclosure, the unique sharing of information about oneself which would not otherwise be known, is examined in the following discussion. While knowledge of same-sex and mixed-sex disclosures are valuable, this research is restricted to the examination of mixed-sex disclosure. The Johari Window is used as a tool to facilitate the understanding of self- awareness as it relates to disclosure. Gender differences are examined to illuminate how mixed-sex orientations alter the self-disclosure process. The research tests the assumption that in mixed-sex disclosures men disclose less and seek control, whereas women disclose more and attempt to uncover feelings. The impact of gender on disclosure is measured by early sex-role orientation, parental teaching, language, socialization, and genetics. Finally, the results are then filtered through the factors of self-disclosure revealing the rewards and risks of mixed-sex self-disclosure.
dc.title"Knowing Me, Knowing You" Self-Disclosure: Gender Gap Analysis
dc.typethesis
carrollscholars.object.degreeBachelor's
carrollscholars.object.departmentCommunication Studies
carrollscholars.object.disciplinesCommunication; Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; Gender, Race, Sexuality, and Ethnicity in Communication; Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies
carrollscholars.legacy.itemurlhttps://scholars.carroll.edu/communication_theses/29
carrollscholars.legacy.contextkey11965670
carrollscholars.object.seasonSpring
dc.date.embargo12/31/1899 0:00


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