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dc.contributor.advisorGraham, Loren
dc.contributor.advisorReeves, Virginia
dc.contributor.advisorStewart, Kevin
dc.contributor.authorKearns, Jackson
dc.date.accessioned2022-07-20T17:43:31Z
dc.date.available2022-07-20T17:43:31Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholars.carroll.edu/handle/20.500.12647/10616
dc.description.abstractThe following is a novella which follows a character, Atlas, named for the famous Atlas who held the Earth above his shoulders by his great strength—but named not for that reason—named rather for that selfsame Atlas’s size, enormous by comparison to the Earth he held above him. Imagine a man of that size. Wherever could a man like that fit into the tiny Earth he held above him? This is Atlas’s entire story in many ways. He is a man trapped—trapped in a world that is too small for him, trapped in himself and by himself, unable to escape his own perception of the cage which holds him and thus trapped in his very mind itself. As Atlas traverses his life and his relationships (or attempts to, to the best of his ability), he reveals himself to be a man who could never fit into this world. The tragedy of a man like that is Atlas’s story. Within this novella is the story of Cain and Abel, gone somewhat astray, the story of love and loss, of loyalty and betrayal, of captivity and freedom, of life and death, and of a horse named “Alula.” But most of all, this novella is the story of the human condition gone wrong and the ultimate depths of the failing of self.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAlulaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
carrollscholars.object.degreeBachelor'sen_US
carrollscholars.object.departmentLanguages and Literatureen_US
carrollscholars.object.seasonSpringen_US


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