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dc.contributor.advisorSumridge, Molly
dc.contributor.authorWilcox, Shelbie
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-21T21:23:50Z
dc.date.available2021-04-21T21:23:50Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholars.carroll.edu/handle/20.500.12647/10403
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LkewYqGYRJo
dc.description.abstractThere has been a lot of studies into the efficacy of e-collars versus positive reinforcement, as well as their impact on the dog's health. Many studies have found that e-collars are no more effective than positive reinforcement in improving behavioral problems. Other research examined the physiological impact of e-collar training strategies on the dog and discovered that positive reinforcement techniques caused less discomfort in the dog than negative reinforcement techniques, implying that negative reinforcement techniques could be detrimental to the dog's welfare. Since there has been so much literature on the possible harmful consequences of using e-collars, this study seeks to figure out why owners want to use them and whether or not they believe it has adversely or positively impacted their relationship with their dog. After analyzing responses, E-collars appear to serve a specific need for dog owners, specifically by being reliable and increasing freedom through off-leash communication. Overall, by understanding the needs of dog owners, the training community can find ways to improve and increase the effectiveness of training methods which will in return improve human-animal relationships and overall animal welfare.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDog Training Electronicallyen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
carrollscholars.object.departmentAnthrozoologyen_US
carrollscholars.object.coursenumberANZ 486en_US
carrollscholars.object.coursenameIndependent Studyen_US
carrollscholars.object.majorAnthrozoologyen_US


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